Tag: rookie ref

Playing with your watch – Rodric Leerling

Playing with your watch – Rodric Leerling

Another rookie ref to mentor last weekend. A 17-year old officiating his 2nd game for the Dutch FA. He kindly called me to say he was 10mins late and where we could meet.

He did the usual checks: pitch, players and AR’s. We met the latter in his dressing room and got thumbs up from both assistants for his clear instructions. Continue reading “Playing with your watch – Rodric Leerling”

Rookie Refs Can Be Lazy – Rodric Leerling

Rookie Refs Can Be Lazy – Rodric Leerling

The rookie ref this weekend wasn’t that young. In fact, he told me he had been serving several football clubs as club referee and now wanted to join the Dutch FA. He needed more challenge and variation in this assigned games. Continue reading “Rookie Refs Can Be Lazy – Rodric Leerling”

Everybody happy with the new digital player passes? – Rodric Leerling

Everybody happy with the new digital player passes? – Rodric Leerling

Well, not the club I visited last weekend to accompany a new referee. The new FA referee was experienced as club official and performed the new player passes check professionally in the dressingroom. Continue reading “Everybody happy with the new digital player passes? – Rodric Leerling”

No Cornerflags, No Dressing Rooms And A Rookie Ref – Rodric Leerling

No Cornerflags, No Dressing Rooms And A Rookie Ref – Rodric Leerling

My ref season started last week with accompanying a new, young referee. At least something I can do while being injured. Continue reading “No Cornerflags, No Dressing Rooms And A Rookie Ref – Rodric Leerling”

“No support needed” – Rodric Leerling

“No support needed” – Rodric Leerling

warmingup-refs
Rodric Leerling, Leerling.biz, Sales Power Provider, RefRod
So far, I only had teenage refs to accompany as part of  my ref coaching course. This weekend, the FA asked me to accompany someone just slightly older than me.

First question that came up, of course, was why someone at this age would still consider becoming a licensed ref? The Dutch FA is desperate for more refs to handle adult games, so he will be warmly welcomed. But at his age a ref career is limited to lower adult games.

With approximately twenty years of club refereeing and team training under his belt, he simply wanted to add a degree to his football palmares. In fact, he demonstrated being able to lead a game quite easily, spotting most fouls, and dealing with players quite easily. But very often at a distance and not at full speed. Being a club ref, there are less formalities and no decorum to take heed of. Entering the pitch on your own, dropping the flags on the centre spot and then wait for the teams to arrive is a no-no for FA refs. Nobody really cared, and hardly anyone was watching.

Starting a game without basic warming-up is another ‘faux-pas’. You simply can’t afford running a 90 minutes game without a good physical preparation, certainly at our age. And this was only a game in the 2nd league for reserve teams. After the match, we discussed these apparent new game elements to notice next time and he acknowledged it.

It will be a simple report this time. He will do well as new Dutch FA ref but has to work on his physics to be able keep pace with higher level games. And he needs to bring some decorum to the games. The spectators will appreciate this.

“Hitting Gold” – Rodric Leerling

Rodric Leerling, Leerling.biz, Sales Power Provider, RefRod

Most important reason to join the FA ref coach course was to be able to help young refs with their new hobby. My active sports time is almost over and it’s time to share my experience and help the rookie refs making it up the ladder faster.

This weekend, I was assigned to a rookie ref who just oozed being a potential top referee. He had to deal with the usual admin hassle with player passes and getting everyone on the field in time. At this lower level that’s nothing new and soon this will get more professional. We had a brief chat before the game and the rookie ref challenged me immediately with a disputed call he saw on TV the other night. He explained the situation clearly and told me he agree with the ref decision. From what he described to me it became obvious he knew how to evaluate a situation and take a decision fast.

I analysed the pitch before he could and left an obvious net problem to be reported. Which he in fact did and he asked the field marshal to correct it. The U-15 game itself wasn’t too difficult, mostly because he noticed most of the fouls and was consequent in his calls. In our brief half-time chat I warned him that the shirt pulling and pushing might get out of hand and he might have to be more strict in his calls. Twenty minutes in the 2nd half it happened: an attacker was pushed down clearly in the box and the rookie ref pointed to the penalty kick spot. And remarkably hardly anybody complained.

He left the pitch after 90 minutes with a big smile. I complimented him on a great game. He thanked me kindly for my help and the suggestions made. I told him I would keep my eyes on the rosters to see him climb the ref career ladder. A future top referee, no doubt.